Comment Letters

October 18, 2019 | Filed under: Other Areas of Interest

NACA submitted comments to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development urging it not to revise its 2013 Disparate Impact Rule. HUD's proposal would seriously weaken disparate impact liability by making it harder for consumers to bring cases and easier for lenders to escape liability.

October 17, 2019 | Filed under: Other Areas of Interest | Tagged with: Tax, Tax Issues, taxes

NACA sends this letter in support of the End Double Taxation of Successful Civil Claims Act introduced by Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto. The bill would would ensure that American consumers are not unfairly penalized when they obtain justice for harm caused by bad actors by creating an above-the-line deduction for consumers who recover their legal fees after winning civil claims.

September 18, 2019 | Filed under: Debt Collection | Tagged with: CFPB, Debt Collection, FDCPA

NACA and its organizational partners submitted a comment to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on its proposed rule on debt collection practices. While there are instances in which the regulations clarify and improve protections, the overall impact of these regulations, should they be promulgated, will be to hurt consumers, not help them. All comments submitted by or on behalf of NACA are available here.

September 18, 2019 | Filed under: Debt Collection | Tagged with: CFPB, Debt Collection, FDCPA

NACA and 42 other consumer, civil and human rights, labor, community, housing, and legal services organizations call upon the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to provide greater protections for consumers with limited English proficiency (LEP) in its proposed rule on debt collection practices. There are many misconceptions about debt collection laws that are heightened by language barriers, leaving LEP consumers vulnerable to harassment and exploitation. All comments submitted by or on behalf of NACA are available here.

September 18, 2019 | Filed under: Debt Collection | Tagged with: CFPB, Debt Collection, FDCPA

NACA urges the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to strengthen its proposed rule on debt collection practices. The proposal does not address existing serious problems within the debt collection market and could expose consumers to increased risk of abuse. All comments submitted by or on behalf of NACA are available here.

September 18, 2019 | Filed under: Debt Collection | Tagged with: CFPB, Debt Collection, FDCPA

NACA and 38 other community, civil rights, consumer, and student advocacy organizations joined a comment to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau urging the CFPB to strengthen its proposed rule on debt collection practices to better protect student loan borrowers. All comments submitted by or on behalf of NACA are available here.

September 18, 2019 | Filed under: Debt Collection | Tagged with: CFPB, Debt Collection, FDCPA

NACA joins with 231 other consumer, civil and human rights, labor, community, and legal services organizations from all 50 states and the District of Columbia on a comment urging the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to strengthen the Bureau's proposed rule on debt collection pracices. All comments submitted by or on behalf of NACA are available here.

September 18, 2019 | Filed under: Debt Collection | Tagged with: CFPB, Debt Collection, FDCPA, Privacy

NACA and 35 other consumer, privacy, civil rights, and public interest organizations submitted a comment to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau outlining privacy concerns raised by the Bureau's proposed rule on debt collection practices. If the rule is finalized as written, the CFPB may be opening the door to increased privacy abuse and security problems. All comments submitted by or on behalf of NACA are available here

September 17, 2019 | Filed under: Forced Arbitration | Tagged with: Arbitration, forced arbitration

NACA to Congress: The Forced Arbitration Injustice Repeal Act would bar forced arbitration from deciding the outcome of consumer, civil rights, employment, or antitrust violations. It would restore to harmed consumers and workers the right to choose to go to court before a judge and jury when they are financially or physically harmed. Congress should pass this bill.

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